Blogs

March 19, 2019

Employment, Reasonable Accommodations and Service Animals

Question: A person with a disability comes to work with a service animal. The employee did not ask if they could bring their service animal. The employer was unaware of the service animal prior to person starting work. They showed up with the service animal. Can the employer ask for documentation?

January 29, 2019

Scenario: We received a call from an employer who is having difficulty with a new employee who is a recruiter for the company. This employee has had performance issues which have been addressed on two occasions. She has been placed on probation because she is not performing the job requirements. While discussing steps to release her with HR, she disclosed that she has depression and anxiety; she canceled a meeting with other team members; and then called out of an event that she was expected to be working as part of her job, which left another staff member on their own.

December 11, 2018

Question: A property management company wanted to improve pedestrian access for an employer to a parking area. The new path would connect the parking area to a restricted employee-only entrance. The building already has one accessible restricted employee-only entrance. Is an accessible route required, which may include ramps, or could they construct a simple (inaccessible) path?

November 6, 2018

Scenario:

We received a call from a mother whose son with a disability attends his school's afterschool program until recently when he was hospitalized for three weeks for disability-related reasons.  He is ready to return to school and his afterschool program. The program is first-come-first-serve and has a waitlist. Though the mother had already paid for her son to attend the afterschool program, the school gave his slot to another student.

Questions we asked:

September 12, 2018

This free, self-paced course covers the rights of people with disabilities in housing under the Fair Housing Act, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the ADA. The focus is on reasonable accommodations and reasonable modifications. We will address the definition of disability, the differences between accommodations and modifications, documentation of disability that a housing provider may require, undue burden, fundamental alteration and the request process. Approximately 2 hours. To register go to learn.newenglandada.org

July 26, 2018

Watch PJ Moynihan's new documentary short, 'Recovering Addiction'. And laugh with one of Boston's top comedians Amy Tee as she presents chemical-free comedy, taking self-help to hilarious new heights. Jack Lynch will also join us. A Boston native, with 25 years of experience, has taken his comedy on the road and toured all over the U.S. and parts of Canada.

February 28, 2018

A recent Boston Globe Article focused on re-branding senior centers to attract baby boomers by offering programs like dance, yoga, hiking and canoeing. From New Bedford to Salem – a change is gonna come.

January 8, 2018

Baby Boomers (ages 50-72) want to be out and about. We have evidence that with age, comes disability. Let's prepare now to implement the Americans with Disabilities Act correctly, providing safe access and happiness for family, friends and community. Our new ADA Action Guide for cities and towns makes it easy with seven steps to implementing the ADA.

January 5, 2018

The New England ADA Center is conducting a two-part research study to identify barriers to implementing the ADA in municipalities across New England. In the first part of the study, we use data from the US Census Bureau and other sources to tell stories about aging, disability and the ADA. These stories will inform local officials about the state of disability in their jurisdictions. It will also provide a basis for the second part of the study. The second part of the study will identify barriers to implementing the ADA by surveying cities and towns.

August 4, 2017

We are pleased to share two new public service announcements (PSAs) on ‘Aging, Disability and the ADA’ aimed at reaching older Americans with disabilities who may not be aware they have rights under the ADA. The PSAs feature iconic places in Boston, Cambridge and Worcester with examples of good accessibility that ensures community participation for older Americans that benefits all.  We encourage you to share the link to the PSAs in newsletters, on your websites, in social media and at meetings.

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